Employers…. Say Yes to YESS

Employers, as you are aware, there is a financial cost and risk associated to taking on new staff and I’m sure you’ll agree employers need all the help they can get.

If you are hiring, you may ask the question… Are there any supports available that will allow my company to give a young person a start – gain experience and hopefully prove themselves to be a great addition to my team?

The Youth Employment Support Scheme (YESS) may be the answer!

What is YESS?

The Youth Employment Support Scheme (YESS) is a work experience placement programme which is specifically targeted at young jobseekers aged 18-24 years of age who are long-term unemployed or who face barriers to employment.

The YESS will aim to provide jobseekers with the opportunity to learn basic work and social skills in a supportive environment while on a work placement. The scheme will provide a supportive structure for Participants, including case officer support for both Placement Hosts and jobseekers.

While participation on the YESS will be wholly voluntary for both parties involved, there will be certain qualifying and eligibility conditions that both placement hosts and jobseekers will have to satisfy.

All YESS placements will be advertised on the Jobs Ireland website, Jobsireland.ie and interested jobseekers will have to log onto same to view scheme vacancies.

Who is the YESS for?

The YESS will be available to jobseekers and other eligible cohorts who are aged between 18 and 24 and have been out of work and in receipt of a qualifying payment for at least 12 months, or if unemployed for less than 12 months, be considered by a case officer to face a significant barrier to work.

Note: Candidates must be in receipt of one of the following qualifying payments:

Jobseekers Allowance, Jobseekers Benefit, One Parent Family Payment, Jobseeker Transition Payment, Disability Allowance, Blind Person’s Pension or Supplementary Welfare Allowance.

What will it involve?

The YESS is a programme specifically designed to provide workplace experience opportunities to young jobseekers while on a work placement. Participants on the YESS will be required to work 24 hours per week, and placements will be for 3 months initially, with an option to extend this further to 6 months.

A designated DEASP case officer will liaise with the jobseeker and Host Company throughout the period of the placement, to monitor how well it is progressing for both parties and provide appropriate advice/support. This will include a formal review meeting after 2 months, which will facilitate the case officer in deciding whether to approve a request for an extension of the duration to 6 months.

Clearly defined learning and development outcomes for each placement will also be identified. A Learning and Development Plan will be agreed between all parties at the outset of the placement and the case officer will monitor the progress of same. The placement host will nominate an individual to support and mentor the participant during the placement.

How much is paid?

All participants will receive a payment of €229.20 per week from the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection (DEASP). Participants whose underlying entitlement is in excess of that amount will continue to receive their weekly payment with an additional top-up allowance of €22.50 per week.

The YESS commenced Monday 1st October 2018, and is open to applications.

Where is the YESS available?

The YESS will is available to eligible jobseekers nationwide, but will be dependent on employers offering placements throughout the country.

Employers: The YESS will be open to organisations in the private, community and voluntary sectors only. There will be clear eligibility requirements for placement Hosts to participate on the scheme, and they must agree to Terms and Conditions when they advertise a placement.

All YESS placements must be advertised on the Department’s Jobs Ireland website, Jobsireland.ie and employers must register on this site to do so.

Am I eligible to host a placement?

The eligibility criteria for an employer to host a YESS placement include the following:

  • An organisation, or a local branch, must certify that they have a minimum of 1 full-time employee who is employed for 30 hours or more per week (i.e. on payroll and subject to PAYE and PRSI)
  • The Placement Host should be a legal entity and / or a charity recognised by the Revenue Commissioners (with a CHY number)
  • The scheme is open to sole traders who satisfy the conditions of the scheme
  • The placement host should be fully compliant with all legal requirements
  • The placement host’s Public/Employers Liability insurance and Motor insurance, if applicable, should cover any participants on the programme.
  • The placement host should be fully compliant with current workplace Health and Safety and all other legal and sectoral requirements
  • The placement must be in accordance with the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission’s Code of Practice on Sexual Harassment and Harassment at Work

The Youth Employment Support Scheme is co-funded by the Irish Government, the European Social Fund and the Youth Employment Initiative as part of the ESF Programme for Employability, Inclusion and Learning 2014-2020

For further information on the scheme qualifying criteria, please click here The Youth Employment Support Scheme (YESS) .

 

Body Language – Picking Up and Understanding Nonverbal Signals

Today we are going to look at Body Language – the art of non verbal communication.

What Is Body Language?

Put simply, body language is the unspoken element of communication that we use to reveal our true feelings and emotions. Our gestures, facial expressions and posture. When we are able to “read” these signs, we can use it to our advantage.

For example, it can help us to understand the complete message of what someone is trying to say to us, and to enhance our awareness of people’s reactions to what we say and do.

We can also use it to adjust our own body language so that we appear more positive, engaging and approachable.

How to Read Negative Body Language.

Being aware of negative body language in others can allow you to pick up on unspoken issues or bad feelings. So, in this section, we’ll highlight some negative nonverbal signals that you should look out for.

Difficult Conversations and Defensiveness

Difficult or tense conversations  are an uncomfortable fact of life at work. Perhaps you’ve had to deal with a difficult customer, or needed to talk to someone about his or her poor performance . Or maybe you’ve negotiated a major contract.

Ideally, these situations would be resolved calmly. But, often they are complicated by feelings of nervousness, stress, defensiveness, or even anger. And, though we may try to hide them, these emotions often show through in our body language.

For example, if someone is exhibiting one or more of the following behaviours, he will likely be disengaged, disinterested or unhappy:

  • Arms folded in front of the body
  • Minimal or tense facial expression
  • Body turned away from you
  • Eyes downcast, maintaining little contact

Being aware of these signs can help you to adjust what you say and how you say it, so you can make him feel more at ease and receptive to your viewpoint

  • Arms relaxed
  • Friendly facial expression
  • Good eye contact
  • Engaging posture

When you use positive body language, it can add strength  to the verbal messages or ideas that you want to convey, and help you to avoid sending mixed or confusing signals

How to Project Positive Body Language

In this section, we’ll describe some basic postures that you can adopt to project self-confidence and openness.

Making a Confident First Impression

These tips can help you to adjust your body language so that you make a great first impression:

  • Have an open posture. Be relaxed, but don’t slouch! Sit or stand upright and place your hands by your sides. Avoid standing with your hands on your hips, as this will make you appear larger, which can communicate aggression or a desire to dominate.
  • Use a firm handshake. But don’t get carried away! You don’t want it to become awkward or, worse, painful for the other person. If it does, you’ll likely come across as rude or aggressive.
  • Maintain good eye contact. Try to hold the other person’s gaze for a few seconds at a time. This will show her that you’re sincere and engaged. But, avoid turning it into a staring match!
  • Avoid touching your face. There’s a common perception that people who touch their faces while answering questions are being dishonest. While this isn’t always true, it’s best to avoid fiddling with your hair or touching your mouth or nose, particularly if your aim is to come across as trustworthy.

We previously published a blog on Soft skills – “it’s not what you say but how you say it that’s important” – Check it out!

The Great Reveal: How to Answer the “Tell Me About Yourself” Interview Question

This question is generally asked at the opening of an interview – it can be a great asset to answer it correctly but it is one that you can get very wrong. It can also be framed, take me through your CV, outlining the areas of your work experience and competencies in relation to the role of…

This question strikes fear in people and they commonly say – “I don’t know what the employer is looking for” – You will know by reading the Job Advert and the Person Specification carefully – underline the key words: Prepare, Prepare, Prepare! If you prepare you’ll be surprised how easily you will sail through your answer.

Know The Buyer!

The employer has listed what they want in the Job Advertisement – it’s up to you to tell them that you have the required skills / attributes – use their words in your answer.

The best answer will begin by briefly telling the employer what they are looking for and then outline your main selling points that explains that you have what they require. When you focus on your relevant qualifications for the job you increase your chances of convincing the interviewer that you are ready for the challenge.

Why Interviewers Ask You the “Tell Me About Yourself” Question

From the interviewer’s perspective, this enquiry is one of the best for finding out if a candidate is suited to the role. It is worth remembering that the hiring manager wants to like you; it is in their interest to find the best candidates for their company. Recruitment is an expensive business and they want to get it right first time. The idea is to get you talking and to hear from you that you are the right person for the job.

How to Answer “Tell Me About Yourself”

You can use the most frequently stated do’s and don’ts in job interviews to help you avoid ineffectively answering any interview question. The don’ts when answering this particular question can be summed up:

Don’t

  • Regurgitate your CV
  • Be too modest OR too arrogant
  • Include irrelevant information such as your favourite colour or wine
  • Discuss aspects of your career that have little or no relevance to the role or industry in question

You need to answer this question with laser-like precision, and it is a much simpler task than you think. The best answer to any common interview question is short and succinct. You may need to inject just enough personality to get the hiring manager to like you but resist the urge to ramble, brag, or hide in your shell. A great answer involves the following:

Do

  • Detail ‘Who’ You Are: Begin by outlining who you are professionally and throw in a couple of strengths
  • Provides an Overview of Your Skills: Your interviewer may not remember your CV, so remind them by highlighting a few key skills that make you a good fit for the job
  • Explain Why You Want the Job: If we’re cynical, the main reason to get a job is to pay your rent and not starve to death, but the interviewer already knows that! Instead, outline that you want a new challenge and believe that the company and the job offer’s it.

Things to Avoid When Answering “Tell Me About Yourself”

Perhaps the biggest mistake interviewees make when answering this question is to go off on a tangent. The result is an answer that is an incoherent and rambling mess. You know it is a common interview question, so there is no excuse for not creating a ‘scripted’ answer and sticking to it. Remember, it is usually one of the first questions asked, so there is little danger of repeating information already mentioned in the interview.

In any case, here are a few things you should avoid mentioning:

  • Religious or Political Affiliations: Avoid at all costs. You have no idea if the interviewer shares your views, so it is best to keep a lid on it
  • Personal Information: This means anything you wouldn’t ordinarily tell a stranger. It also relates to information about your family

Frequently Asked Interview Questions Related to ‘Tell Me About Yourself”

  • While the following questions are not necessarily the same as “Tell me about yourself,” they are all designed to gain a greater insight into ‘who’ you are personally and professionally.

 

  • “Describe Yourself”
  • “Why Would You Like to Work for Us?”
  • “What Makes You Unique?”
  • “Outline What You Do in Your Current Position.”
  • “Where Do You See Yourself In 5/10 Years?”
  • “What Motivates You?”
  • “What Are You Passionate About?”
  • “Why Should We Hire You?”
  • “Why Do You Want This Job?”
  • “Why Did You Leave Your Last Job?”

In summary: Read the Job Advert / Person Specification; if you have what they are looking for or as near as possible begin by outlining what they want and proceed to tell them that you have the skills, experience, and drive to successfully do the Job.

Good Luck!

Waterford City Local Employment Service continues to offer excellent value

Ger Walsh – Manager of Waterford City Local Employment Service (LES) – has welcomed the finding of research commissioned by the DEASP that the not for-profit Local Employment Service (LES) nationally is successfully achieving full-time employment placement for 28.8% of those referred to them annually.

In addition, whilst working with those with lower qualification levels and most in need of employment supports, the LES has progressed the majority of its remaining caseload to part-time jobs and other pathways to work such as further training and employment schemes.

The research also found that a very high proportion of LES clients who responded to Indecon’s research “indicated that their attendance with a Local Employment Service had been beneficial, with 75% stating that their engagement had motivated them to find work or to undertake further education or training.”

The service also received significant endorsement from the employers who engage with it, with 89% of respondents indicating that their engagement with an LES had helped them to find suitable candidates for available jobs, while 83% of employers stated that the LES provided an efficient recruitment service for their organisation. “The LES approach is serving jobseekers and the state well. At this time of welcome falls in unemployment, there are still many who need significant support to achieve job-readiness and access the labour market”, said Ger.

“We work intensively with people in their local community, helping them to address any barriers to employment including skills needs, mental health issues, self-esteem and personal discipline”.

“Placing almost 30% of referrals into full-time employment is a significant achievement but it must also be recognised that for many of the today’s jobseekers, progression to a part-time job, internship, employment scheme or further training are valid pathways to full-time employment and career development”.

He continued: “The cost per full-time employment placement is €2544 and this reduces significantly when part-time positions are taken into account. The savings to the state in welfare payments as well as the transfer to the state in new tax income are considerable. In this context, the figures represent excellent value for money and demonstrate the benefits of collaboration between the state and not-for-profit community organisations.”

At present, the Public Employment Service (PES) is delivered either by the Department’s own Intreo service or by private contractors through Jobpath or by community-based, not-for-profit companies operating the Local Employment Service (LES) and Jobs Clubs.

The Indecon Report heralds a reconfiguration of these services in 2020. Whilst preparing to respond to the upcoming changes, Irish Local Development Network’s Marie Price Bolger cautions on the lessons from other sectors that followed a privatisation route,

“The value of community-based, not-for-profit employment services must be protected in any reconfiguration of Public Employment Services. They give an efficient, accessible service to jobseekers, they give transparency and value-for money to the taxpayer, they give the greatest level of control and agility to the funder, and their track record is endorsed by employers. Whilst all services need to continually adapt to changing circumstances, these key advantages must be safeguarded in any reconfiguration.”

JobsPlus: New Jobs – Less Cost

Employers, are you hiring?

Jobseekers are you looking to give yourself the edge over other applicants?

Government Grants of €7,500 and €10,000 are available

Not many things in life are free but here’s one: JobsPlus

What is JobsPlus? It is an incentive from the Department of Social Protection. It is designed to reward employers who offer employment of over 30 hours per week to recruits from the live register. Grants of €7,500 and €10,000 are available. The majority Waterford City Local Employment Service’s clients are eligible for JobsPlus.

How can I register? There are two parts. Firstly, Employers must register for JobsPlus, by following the link below:

https://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/secure/jobsplus-employer.aspx

When employers are approved they will receive an email confirming that they have been approved. The status of all applications can be attained by calling 071 9672535 / 071 9672583.

Secondly, Jobseekers must register their interest by accessing the link below:

https://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/secure/jobsplus-employee.aspx

When the Jobseeker is approved they will receive a letter of acceptance in the post. The status of all applications can be attained by calling 071 9672535 / 071 9672583.

How much is the incentive? A grant of €7,500 is payable over two years for Jobseekers on the live register over 12 months and €10,000 for Jobseekers on the live register more than 36 months.

However, in addition to the above A grant of €7,500 is payable to:

Jobseekers under 25 years of age and on the live register for at least 4 months in the previous 6 months.

Former one parent family customers whose youngest child is 7 years of age or over who transfers to the live register and are now in receipt of Jobseekers allowance transition payment and they have NO qualifying period.

Persons with refugee status and in receipt of Jobseekers allowance also have NO qualifying period.

A grant of €10,000 is payable to: Jobseekers over 50 years of age who are on the live register and have been at least 12 months unemployed in the previous 18 months.

How will the incentive be paid? The incentive will be payable monthly in arrears, over a two year period by Electronic Fund Transfer (EFT), by the Department of Social Protection.

Interested? Employers, follow the link to become approved for JobsPlushttps://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/secure/jobsplus-employer.aspx

Jobseekers to increase your chances of employment follow the link – https://www.welfare.ie/en/Pages/secure/jobsplus-employer.aspx.

Waterford City Local Employment Service have almost 5000 followers on Facebook, we provide a free and confidential service to businesses of all sizes and are designed to make the recruitment process easy and hassle-free. If you have any questions call Ger on 051-304951 / 086 142550.

 

A New Year – A New Start

Great News!  From New Year’s Day, people in receipt of Jobseeker’s Benefit who take on subsidiary seasonal and casual work can earn up to €7,500 a year without impacting their rights to their Benefit.

We hear from jobseekers that casual work brings massive complications when they have to sign off and on etc., so it can be difficult to accept short term work.  Changes like this will hopefully give more flexibility and encouragement to people who want to work and will also help employers who need casual staff on an Adhoc Basis. We all know that a job is far more than a pay check and hopefully initiatives like this will help to secure more long term opportunities for all.

Read more on official announcement here; http://www.welfare.ie/en/pressoffice/Pages/pr211218.aspx